February 24 , 2021 /

NOMADLAND AND BEYOND

We have been part of the RV world for almost 25 years.  It’s an interesting sub-culture that has a lifestyle that includes people who live full-time on the road and others, like us, who are occasional part-time travelers. We are drawn to the freedom and independence that RV’s offer.  We go where we want, when

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February 3 , 2021 /

ALAMOS REDEMPTION

Post from Alamos, Sonora, Mexico. 2/3/2120 “Hope, friendship, freedom and perseverance…” Kshitij Rawat. (referring to Shawshank Redemption) After a year of limited travel because. like almost everyone, we have beenmostly isolated and quarantined. So, we planned an escape. Promising to remain masked and distanced we were ready.  We locked the door behind us, boarded the

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July 17 , 2020 /

ROAD TRIP – SUMMARY

Summarizing 5 weeks and 4,200 miles without too many details and yet enough to perhaps be interesting or tempting to other campers, travelers, and road trippers is a challenging self-assignment. A log of departures, destinations, and mileage appears at the bottom of this piece.  The original trip was intended to be 6 weeks and include

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July 10 , 2020 /

ON THE ROAD – SANTA FE

Santa Fe and Abiquiu was home for us from 1996-2018 and then we returned for another year after a 2 year sojourn in northern California.  On this 6 week, 5,000+ mile road trip we were back in CA and now we have been in NM for the past 6 days.  Record heat is pushing us

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July 4 , 2020 /

ON THE ROAD – JULY 4

We are actually off the road this July 4, taking a day of R&R at the foot of Ute Mountain near Towaoc, Colorado, about 10 miles south of Cortez, along Route 160.  The history of the Ute Indians is an interesting one along with the histories of other Native American tribes and pueblos and the

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June 29 , 2020 /

ON THE ROAD – COLUMBIA RIVER

Four days along the Columbia River, 2nd largest in the United States.  Named Columbia by Robert Gray, the first to sail across the bar and into the river in 1792. The Mississippi River – 593,000 cubic feet per second. The St. Lawrence River – 348,000 cubic feet per second. … The Columbia River -265,000 cubic

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